Arts & Lit

image/Caleb Hahne
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One click away: Caleb Hahne

Caleb Hahne is a recent grad (he’s the kind of 21 year old that makes me feel like I’ve done nothing with the same number of years) from the Rocky Mountain College of Art & Design whose work revolves around the utilisation of technology and traditional techniques to confront the allure of a blooming cyber media. Or, in more practical terms, he creates mixed media collages that borrow from classical antiquity, internet culture as well as art theory.

“Mocking life while imitating figures in a relatable, distant, and monumental state is what haunts me, and I love it.”

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image/Caleb Hahne
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Interview: Caleb Hahne

Caleb Hahne is a recent grad (he’s the kind of 21 year old that makes me feel like I’ve done nothing with the same number of years) from the Rocky Mountain College of Art & Design whose work revolves around the utilisation of technology and traditional techniques to confront the allure of a blooming cyber media. Or, in more practical terms, he creates mixed media collages that borrow from classical antiquity, internet culture as well as art theory.

I’m currently interested in light as a metaphor of life, and how my stone figures mock life as they sit in a state of infinite death.

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very first accident/Zeren Badar
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One click away: Zeren Badar

“Oh no! I’ve just cracked an egg on the old master that was casually on my kitchen counter, that so wasn’t a frying pan!”

This is how I like to imagine the internal monologue of self-professed “penniless photographer” Zeren Badar as he created his ‘Very First Accident’ in the ‘Accident Series’. However, the consciously constructed nature of its composition may suggest other wise.

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art is fresh/Zeren Badar
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Interview: Zeren Badar

Tongue wryly in cheek, “penniless photographer” Zeren Badar ‘accidentally’ layers found objects (cereal, fridge magnets, rubber bands) on top of cheap reprints of older, often classic, paintings to create temporary Duchampian readymades which are destroyed after they’re photographed. The juxtaposition of these seemingly incompatible materials produces fun works that question how we value the art work we see, how we see the genre of still life and how the creative capacity of our breakfast could be embraced if only we were to slip by a DaVinci. (more…)

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